KAPKAR / 4P-CL8 | Land/Slide Possible Futures | Markham Toronto

KAPKAR / 4P-CL8 | Land/Slide Possible Futures | Markham Toronto

September 21 – October 14, 2013 – Artist in Residence + exhibiton

Jan-Feb 2014 part of the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Bi-City Bienale for Urbanism & Architecture 2014, Shenzhen Canadian Pavillion.

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‘Frank Havermans builds on an extant pulley system to create an internal web that suspends an external array of metal bars that grow haphazardly off the walls. The past and the present come together in strangely appropriate pairs that emphasize the radical shifts in urban temperament you pass on your way to the site: recently plowed fields next to massive condo towers, strip malls beside hundred-year-old houses. Whose place is this and who belongs here are just two of the questions you have to ask even before you get to the art.’ Terence Dick on Akimbo 01-10-2013

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Link to the website of Land/Slide

Ondersteund door een projectbijdrage van het Mondriaanfonds | Supported by The Mondrianfund

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Curated by Janine Marchessault

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Ain Baxter& | Adrian Blackwell + Jane Hutton | Blue Republic | Angel Chen | Aron Louis Cohen | Patricio Davila + Dave Colangelo | Christine Davis | Department of Unusual Certainties | Duke and Battersby | Ken Gregoru | David Han | Phil Hoffman | Mark-David Hosale | Terrance Houle | Maria Hupfield | Ali Kazimi | David Kidman | Deirdre Logue | Marman and Borins | Martindale + Myers + Mackinnon | Allyson Mitchell | Julie Nagam | David Harris Smith | Skyhill Collective | Laura St. Pierre | Jennie Suddick | Xu Tan | Jeff Thomas | Tongue & Groove | Camille Turner | L + I Glynis Logue | Timeanddesire | Heather Rigby | Caitlin Fisher

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‘Landslide – Possible Futures’ was exhibited at the Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism/ Architecture – ‘Urban Border’

Shenzhen, Canadian Pavilion

December 5, 2013 – Februari 28 2014

Curated by Janine Marchessault in collaboration with Yan Wu, Gendai Gallery

link to Landslide at ‘Urban Border’ Shenzhen

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MondriaanFonds_logo_EN_diap

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The Strickler Barn contains four interesting hoist pulleys that express the beauty of primal craftsmanship. Frank Havermans considers these tools as the ultimate form of local intelligence and self-sufficiency. Reincarnated and transformed by a system of pulleys and wheels, the hoist tools use tension to hold up an urban structure outside the barn.

The Markham Museum lies on the edge of the former pioneer village of Markham that today has long been annexed by Toronto, just like other villages in the vicinity. Markham still has a historic centre but the largest part of its territory is taken up by endless, uniform new suburbs. This is presently the fastest growing urban area in Canada and even in the whole of North America. It is remarkable that the largest part of these new towns are populated by Asian immigrants, mainly Chinese who buy not just a house but also the freedom associated with moving to Canada. This is a lucrative industry for Canadian project developers who cleverly play into their expectations. An endless number of tightly arranged, freestanding timber-framed homes in that typical romantic-looking North American style is being put up in no time. These developments replace fine arable land forcing farmers to move. Old houses are being broken down or moved sometimes to the Markham Heritage Estate where enthusiasts can buy a plot of land to relocate the house to, with the obligation to restore it. Several other remarkable buildings from the community have ended up in the adjacent open air museum, the Markham Museum. They are being cared for in a somewhat odd environment where the buildings are shown in a newly staged context.

The Strickler Barn, the barn I chose for my project and worked at for five weeks as an artist in residence, has been moved, along with the house, from a location at the side of the road to someplace else on the premises. The entire context, the landscape and the farmyard, have disappeared. The archetypical shape and the interesting wooden construction of the barn stand out, signifying strength. The interior contains four extraordinary pulley hoists that express the beauty of craftsmanship and ingenuity. I considers these tools as the ultimate form of local intelligence and self-sufficiency. I found the hoists when I first visited the Strickler Barn. The barn turned out to be crammed with old equipment and other stuff. The four obsolete tools were abandoned thoughtlessly on the beams. Research showed that these hoists were meant to pull up full hay-wagons in order to unload them at a point higher up in the barn. I decided to integrate them in my installation, reincarnating and revalidating them. Together with a number of current tensioners that I designed, they form an intricate play of instruments putting strain on various ropes. These ropes disappear outside through cracks in the boards where they hold up a city structure, pulling it tight against the side of the barn. The structure evolved from an 1848 map based on concession lines. It proliferates over the barn, unplanned and uncontrollable like a black urban virus determined to overgrow the barn completely.

Is the ingenuity that enabled past inhabitants to develop such fascinating hoists and barns the same human ingenuity employed to develop these serial suburbs? In that case, the very ingenuity that brought forth the farmland, the pioneer villages and its buildings filled with tools, is now responsible for its demise.

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Frank Havermans (NL) is an architectural artist/designer. His work derives from a combined fascination for architectural space, constructions and urban dynamics. He is an observer who connects his concepts with human scale and tangible structures. Havermans’s work has been shown in China, Hong Kong, Brazil, Canada Indonesia and several European countries,. He participated in the Architectural biennale of Sao Paulo and Hong Kong, in several international artist in residencies and has been awarded with numerous nominations, grants and commission works. In 2005 he won the Wood Architecture prize. Frank Havermans regularly teaches as a guest professor at various art and architecture academies.
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9. Studio Frank Havermans | LandSlide Markham Toronto | photo by Will Putz
8. Studio Frank Havermans | LandSlide Markham Toronto | photo by Will Putz
7. Studio Frank Havermans | LandSlide Markham Toronto | photo by Will Putz
1. 2. Studio Frank Havermans | LandSlide Markham Toronto | photo by Will Putz
1. Studio Frank Havermans | LandSlide Markham Toronto | photo by Will Putz
14. Studio Frank Havermans | LandSlide Markham Toronto | photo by Will Putz6. Studio Frank Havermans | LandSlide Markham Toronto | photo by Will Putz
3. Studio Frank Havermans | LandSlide Markham Toronto | photo by Will Putz
4. Studio Frank Havermans | LandSlide Markham Toronto | photo by Will Putz
13. Studio Frank Havermans | LandSlide Markham Toronto | photo by Will Putz
12. Studio Frank Havermans | LandSlide Markham Toronto | photo by Will Putz
5. Studio Frank Havermans | LandSlide Markham Toronto | photo by Will Putz.
10. Studio Frank Havermans | LandSlide Markham Toronto | photo by Will Putz
11. Studio Frank Havermans | LandSlide Markham Toronto | photo by Will Putz
16. Studio Frank Havermans | LandSlide Markham Toronto | photo by Will Putz
 
Opening Land|Slide Possible Futures | Markham Toronto, photo by Piet Hein Hoeksma
Opening Land|Slide Possible Futures | Markham Toronto, photo by Piet Hein Hoeksma
Opening Land|Slide Possible Futures | Markham Toronto, photo by Piet Hein Hoeksma.

Studio Frank Havermans | Strickler barn Markham Museum, Toronto

Studio Frank Havermans | Strickler barn Markham Museum, Toronto

Studio Frank Havermans | Strickler barn Markham Museum, Toronto

Studio Frank Havermans | Strickler barn Markham Museum, Toronto

Studio Frank Havermans | Strickler barn Markham Museum, Toronto

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Land/Slide is a monumental, site-specific public art exhibition curated by Janine Marchessault and supported by the City of Markham (in the greater region of Toronto, Canada), the Social Sciences Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), the Trudeau Foundation, York University and the Public Access Collective. This public exhibition will be staged in Markham at the Markham Museum, a 25-acre open-air museum, from September 21 – October 13, 2013. This project represents a collaboration between the Markham Museum and the Public Access Collective.

Markham is Canada’s newest city, belonging toone of the fastest growing, and most diverse regions in North America. Land/Slide draws on issues relevant to this new city, creating conversations about our planet-in-transition through themes of sustainability, urbanization, land use, food and farming, and overarching concepts of ecology and economy in relation to artistic imagination. The name Land/Slide was chosen because we envision an entirely new way of thinking about the land and its future uses. We wish to reimagine what it means to live sustainably in one of the fastest developing and agriculturally rich areas in North America.

We have invited over 35 international, national, and local artists working in a variety of artistic media (from landscape architecture and design, sculpture, performance, media installation and projection, photography, sound, and locative media) whose work has been engaged with ecological issues (climate change, sustainable energy, alternative farming, waste management and food politics), to help create a collective conversation around the future of land use in rapidly urbanizing environments. The installations and projections will be located throughout, inside and outside the various buildings of Markham Museum’s Heritage site. Along with the exhibition, Land/Slide involves an intensive research initiative and a series of events, building on the Museum’s extensive historical research materials; illuminating old archival stories, bringing in new, alternative histories and imagining utopian futures. The research initiative involves collecting and distributing investigations of themes relevant to the exhibition to the artists and the public. The events, which will occur in conjunction with the exhibition, include artist talks, dinners created by local chefs using local produce, workshops that explore new approaches to urban farming, author readings, talks by leading thinkers in sustainability, evening performances, and weekly tours.

Land/Slide is committed to engaging the community throughout the process. The exhibition includes several Aboriginal and First Nations artists, as well as artists from immigrant communities in Ontario (Chinese and South Asian) whose work is concerned with identity and the experience of immigration. Along with the Exhibition, there will also be an interdisciplinary curriculum at Unionville High School which Brushwood-Rose is overseeing, a learning farm to teach Youth about farming in the Summer 2013 (May-Oct), an international symposium (winter 2014), a book catalogue, workshops, public events such as artist talks, guided walks and other discursive events throughout the exhibition.

Central to Land/Slide are the connections we’ve been building with community organizations and associations within Markham and Toronto, specifically the City of Markham, York Region Food Network, Seeds for Change, Unionville High School and the Association for Chinese Canadian Entrepreneurs to name a few, which will all feed into the content of the exhibition. Land/Slide’s community initiatives are building on both Markham Museum’s and Public Access’ commitments to community engagement.

As a unique, collaborative experiment, the exhibition brings together high-level artists, academics, curators, computer scientists, urban planners, farmers, environmental activists, high school students and community workers to imagine possible futures, reaching beyond the typical contemporary art crowd.

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About Markham

As of July 2012, Markham became one of Canada’s newest cities – previously a suburb located twenty minutes to the North of Toronto. It is also the most demographically diverse municipality in the country with East and South Asian citizens (many newly arrived immigrants) making up more than 65% of the population. Land/Slide is concerned with the different interpretations and experiences of the landscape and history that this diversity represents, and the different possibilities for ecological and social sustainability that these may hold.

Markham serves as a case study through which to develop a community conversation and critical reflection on the future of land use in Toronto’s outer municipalities and to ask: what is the future of development in one of the fastest growing regions in North America, and what impact will this have on our shared sense of what land means (in terms of food, ecology, the inherent value of nature)? We anticipate that the Ontario Greenbelt which crosses Markham, will be an important aspect of our conversation.

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FRANK HAVERMANS

Frank Havermans recent sculptures for the Hong Kong architectural Biennale impressed the curator of Land/Slide–his structures were both sensual and imaginative engagements with existing physical structures. The Land/Slide exhibition is concerned with redesigning the phyisical environment to create sustainable forms of living. Havermans creates both utilitarian and beautiful structures that invite the viewer to ponder the future while considering the disfunctionalities of the past. His familiarity with Chinese architectural practices of building and designing small spaces, his research into urban planning and his artistic practice which draws on architectural histories, make him a great fit for this exhibition. We will be providing him with found materials from the Markham suburbs in which he will be fashioning new models of urban dwelling within the historical framework of this New City, Markham.

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